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ohio marijuana medical marijuana legalizationPetitions are not legally binding, however, they are a good tool to express interest in a political cause, especially when it comes to marijuana reform. If enough people sign a petition, activists and media members can refer to it and point out that the idea(s) contained in the petition have a lot of support, so therefore they should become law. Politicians love to jump on bandwagons when they see that the bandwagon has momentum. Below is a petition to legalize marijuana and hemp in Ohio, along with a link to sign it if you choose:

  • To allow all adults 21 and over who currently use cannabis and hemp in any aspect to continue to do so legally, and to legally possess marijuana-related paraphernalia that will not be subject to any penalty or fine.
  • Legally allow adults that are 21 and over and adult parents 21 and over that have children under 21, who want to engage in the non-commercial cultivation of limited amounts of cannabis and hemp for personal use of up to 6 cannabis plants or 6 hemp plants or up to 6 plants each of the two of up to 12 plants and 8 ounces of usable cannabis and or hemp at any given time in or outside of their residence. And will not be subject to taxation, penalty, fine or any commercial regulations.
  • Legally allow adults that are 21 and over and adult parents 21 and over that have children under 21, who want to engage in the non-commercial cultivation of limited amounts of cannabis and hemp for medical use of up to 6 cannabis plants and 6 hemp plants or up to 6 plants each of the two of up to 12 plants and 8 ounces of usable cannabis and or hemp at any given time in or outside of their residence. And legally allow those parents the right to choose if they want their children to use cannabis medically or under a doctors care in Ohio, that will not be subject to taxation, penalty, fine or any commercial regulations.
  • Legally prevent any monopolizing organizations to obtain all rights to cultivation and production of cannabis and hemp, to allow other business opportunities to adults 21 and over in the state of Ohio. To legally allow adults 21 and over to obtain a license from the state to engage in commercial cultivation and retail sales of cannabis and hemp to any adult 21 and over that will be subject to taxation and commercial regulations.
  • Defelonize all the cannabis and hemp possession crimes, such as the possession of hashish. Legally allow those with felony records from certain cannabis and hemp possession offenses to be able to have their records expunged. To legally allow those serving time for felony offenses of certain cannabis and hemp convictions, to be able to petition for resentencing or release.
  • Legally prevent anyone from not receiving any Ohio benefits such as housing, food, and medical assistance due to cannabis and hemp charges or convictions or consuming cannabis and hemp. Legally prevent employers from testing for cannabis, and from not hiring anyone who uses cannabis and hemp.
  • And to allocate a certain percentage of taxes received by the state to be used for drug rehabilitation and mental health services programs within the entire state of Ohio.

Click here to sign the petition

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O7a200Petitions are not legally binding, however, they are a good tool to express interest in a political cause, especially when it comes to marijuana reform. If enough people sign a petition, activists and media members can refer to it and point out that the idea(s) contained in the petition have a lot of support, so therefore they should become law. Politicians love to jump on bandwagons when they see that the bandwagon has momentum. Below is a petition to legalize marijuana and hemp in Ohio, along with a link to sign it if you choose:

  • To allow all adults 21 and over who currently use cannabis and hemp in any aspect to continue to do so legally, and to legally possess marijuana-related paraphernalia that will not be subject to any penalty or fine.
  • Legally allow adults that are 21 and over and adult parents 21 and over that have children under 21, who want to engage in the non-commercial cultivation of limited amounts of cannabis and hemp for personal use of up to 6 cannabis plants or 6 hemp plants or up to 6 plants each of the two of up to 12 plants and 8 ounces of usable cannabis and or hemp at any given time in or outside of their residence.
  • Legally allow adults that are 21 and over and adult parents 21 and over that have children under 21, who want to engage in the non-commercial cultivation of limited amounts of cannabis and hemp for medical use of up to 6 cannabis plants and 6 hemp plants or up to 6 plants each of the two of up to 12 plants and 8 ounces of usable cannabis and or hemp at any given time in or outside of their residence. And legally allow those parents the right to choose if they want their children to use cannabis medically or under a doctors care in Ohio, that will not be subject to taxation, penalty, fine or any commercial regulations.

Ohio Marijuana; Recreational and Medical Legal in 2016?

  • Legally prevent any monopolizing organizations to obtain all rights to cultivation and production of cannabis and hemp, to allow other business opportunities to adults 21 and over in the state of Ohio. To legally allow adults 21 and over to obtain a license from the state to engage in commercial cultivation and retail sales of cannabis and hemp to any adult 21 and over that will be subject to taxation and commercial regulations.
  • Remove the felonies from all cannabis and hemp possession crimes, such as the possession of hashish. Legally allow those with felony records from certain cannabis and hemp possession offenses to be able to have their records expunged. To legally allow those serving time for felony offenses of certain cannabis and hemp convictions the ability to petition for a lesser sentence or release.
  • Legally prevent anyone from not receiving any Ohio benefits such as housing, food, and medical assistance due to cannabis and hemp charges or convictions or consuming cannabis and hemp. Legally prevent employers from testing for cannabis, and from not hiring anyone who uses cannabis and hemp.
  • And to allocate a certain percentage of taxes received by the state to be used for drug rehabilitation and mental health services programs within the entire state of Ohio.

Click here to sign the petition

 

Until voters see the specific wording of a potential ballot issue that would let Ohioans legally use marijuana for medicinal as well as recreational purposes — likely in January — bystanders should keep in mind the parable of the blind men and the elephant: Assorted details don’t necessarily offer a full picture.

Still, as the Northeast Ohio Media Group reported Dec. 18, the proposal, if final wording matches advance billing, could — distastefully — guarantee ten or so Ohio landholders, and any of their partners or others who might buy into the deal, a monopoly on legal production of marijuana.

That kind of constitutionally entrenched monopoly (as close to a license to print money as there can be) calls to mind Ohio’s 2009 casino amendment.

But at least the casino amendment, which specifies the precise sites where each of four Ohio casinos may operate and the level of investment required, reflects the fact that casinos aren’t an easy-access business. Marijuana growing is. So if the marijuana amendment arrives as advertised, it would be anticompetitive in the extreme (presuming it goes to Ohio voters and voters approve it, two big ifs).

About our editorials

Editorials express the view of the editorial board of The Plain Dealer and Northeast Ohio Media Group — the senior leadership and editorial-writing staff. As is traditional, editorials are unsigned and intended to be seen as the voice of the newspaper.

• Talk about the topic of this editorial in the comments below.

• Send a letter to the editor, which will be considered for print publication.

• Email general questions or comments about the editorial board to Elizabeth Sullivan, opinion director for the Northeast Ohio Media Group.

In theory, the great detail predicted for the marijuana measure’s wording could be aimed at keeping tight reins on legal marijuana production and the crop’s chemical characteristics. But such details are what the General Assembly – not Ohioans marking ballots in voting booths – are usually expected to determine. Law-writing at the ballot box can be perilous.

True, the Republican-ruled legislature is unlikely to touch marijuana legalization with a ten-foot pole, especially for recreational use. While Quinnipiac polling early this year suggested Ohioans widely support legalizing medicinal use of marijuana, it also suggested that only a bare majority supports legalizing recreational use.

Backers of the medicinal-and-recreational issue would have to gather almost 306,000 voters’ signatures for it to reach the ballot. It’s unclear whether an unrelated marijuana issue, to legalize medicinal use only, is still seeking signatures.

The critical question for both issues is whether the assumption they share – that most Ohioans want to make significant changes in marijuana law – is valid. But even if it is a valid assumption, creating an anticompetitive constitutional monopoly aimed at enriching a tiny number of landowners seems like the exact wrong way to go about any conceivable legalization. 

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DENVER (AP) – Colorado emerged as the state with the second-highest percentage of regular marijuana users as it began legalizing the drug, according to a new national study.

The Denver Post (http://dpo.st/1BdXt69) reports the study by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health found about 1 out of 8 Colorado residents older than 12 had used marijuana in the past month. Only Rhode Island topped Colorado in the percentage of residents who reported using pot as often, according to the study.

The study averaged state-specific data over two-year periods. It found that, for the 2011-2012 period, 10.4 percent of Colorado residents 12 and older said they had used pot in the month before being surveyed. That number jumped to 12.7 percent in the 2012-2013 data. That means about 530,000 people in Colorado use marijuana at least once a month, according to the results.

Nationally, about 7.4 percent of people 12 and older reported monthly marijuana use. That’s an increase of about 4 percent.

In Washington state, which also legalized marijuana use and limited possession for adults, monthly pot use rose about 20 percent to 12.3 percent of people 12 and older.

The survey is among the first to quantify pot use in Colorado since late 2012, when voters approved legal pot use and possession for those over 21. But the survey did not analyze data from 2014, when recreational marijuana shops opened, which means it is not a good indication of the effect of commercial sales on marijuana use.

“I don’t think this tells us about the long-term impacts of legalization,” said University of California, Los Angeles, professor Mark Kleiman, who studies marijuana policy. The number of medical marijuana patients in Colorado rose over the same time period, so the results are not surprising, Kleiman said.

He told The Post that researchers will have a better idea about pot use in the first state to legalize recreational sales of the drug once they can focus on data showing how many people use pot daily.

“The fraction of people who are monthly users who are in fact daily users has gone way, way up,” he said.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Until voters see the specific wording of a potential ballot issue that would let Ohioans legally use marijuana for medicinal as well as recreational purposes — likely in January — bystanders should keep in mind the parable of the blind men and the elephant: Assorted details don’t necessarily offer a full picture.

Still, as the Northeast Ohio Media Group reported Dec. 18, the proposal, if final wording matches advance billing, could — distastefully — guarantee ten or so Ohio landholders, and any of their partners or others who might buy into the deal, a monopoly on legal production of marijuana.

That kind of constitutionally entrenched monopoly (as close to a license to print money as there can be) calls to mind Ohio’s 2009 casino amendment.

But at least the casino amendment, which specifies the precise sites where each of four Ohio casinos may operate and the level of investment required, reflects the fact that casinos aren’t an easy-access business. Marijuana growing is. So if the marijuana amendment arrives as advertised, it would be anticompetitive in the extreme (presuming it goes to Ohio voters and voters approve it, two big ifs).

About our editorials

Editorials express the view of the editorial board of The Plain Dealer and Northeast Ohio Media Group — the senior leadership and editorial-writing staff. As is traditional, editorials are unsigned and intended to be seen as the voice of the newspaper.

• Talk about the topic of this editorial in the comments below.

• Send a letter to the editor, which will be considered for print publication.

• Email general questions or comments about the editorial board to Elizabeth Sullivan, opinion director for the Northeast Ohio Media Group.

In theory, the great detail predicted for the marijuana measure’s wording could be aimed at keeping tight reins on legal marijuana production and the crop’s chemical characteristics. But such details are what the General Assembly – not Ohioans marking ballots in voting booths – are usually expected to determine. Law-writing at the ballot box can be perilous.

True, the Republican-ruled legislature is unlikely to touch marijuana legalization with a ten-foot pole, especially for recreational use. While Quinnipiac polling early this year suggested Ohioans widely support legalizing medicinal use of marijuana, it also suggested that only a bare majority supports legalizing recreational use.

Backers of the medicinal-and-recreational issue would have to gather almost 306,000 voters’ signatures for it to reach the ballot. It’s unclear whether an unrelated marijuana issue, to legalize medicinal use only, is still seeking signatures.

The critical question for both issues is whether the assumption they share – that most Ohioans want to make significant changes in marijuana law – is valid. But even if it is a valid assumption, creating an anticompetitive constitutional monopoly aimed at enriching a tiny number of landowners seems like the exact wrong way to go about any conceivable legalization. 

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ohio marijuana medical marijuana legalizationThere are numerous states planning a 2016 marijuana legalization effort. There are also a few states targeting a 2015 effort via their State Legislatures. But there is one state that has it’s sights set on an initiative during the 2015 Election, and it’s not a state that most expected to see put forth such an effort. The State of Ohio is seeing marijuana activists organize for a 2015 effort, per Cleveland.Com:

A campaign to legalize the medical and recreational use of marijuana in Ohio is quietly taking shape and includes plans to place an amendment to the Ohio Constitution before voters in November 2015, the Northeast Ohio Media Group has learned.

The campaign plans to push an amendment, that if approved by voters, would guarantee a ten or so property owners the right to grow marijuana, according to sources who spoke on the condition they not be named.

By embedding in the constitution where marijuana can be produced – and essentially who can profit from its production – organizers are using an approach similar to the one gambling interests used in their 2009 successful campaign to  allow casino-style gaming. That amendment, known on the ballot as Issue 3, limited gaming to just four locations in Ohio.

There are actually two separate campaigns pursuing reform. Ohio Rights Group is pursuing the medical marijuana effort, and Responsible Ohio is leading the recreational effort. Both efforts must gather nearly 400,000 valid signatures to put either issue before Ohio voters, which is no small task in such a short time frame. But, with that being said, I hope they both succeed.

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HUDSON, Ohio – A Colorado man and a New Jersey woman accused of shuttling $1.1 million of hydroponic marijuana through Ohio now face criminal charges.

Terrance G. Hays, 63, and Beth L. Devine, 62, were caught Wednesday during a traffic stop with 234 pounds of the drug inside their Ford Taurus, the Ohio State Highway Patrol said.

Both face a felony charge of trafficking with marijuana.

Their car was stopped for a lane change violation at 2:31 p.m. on the Ohio Turnpike at mile marker 185.

Troopers discovered the marijuana after drug dogs indicated that drugs were in the car, according to the highway patrol.

Hays and Devine were booked in the Summit County jail.

Each faces up to eight years in prison if convicted. 

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – Marijuana would be legal in Ohio for both personal and medical use under a proposal that’s beginning its way toward next year’s ballot.

ResponsibleOhio, a coalition of legalization proponents, says it will pursue a 2015 constitutional amendment that would allow adults 21 and older to access marijuana as they do alcohol: through a system that’s taxed and regulated by the state. Taxes would be distributed by some formula to local communities.

Spokeswoman Lydia Bolander said lifting Ohio’s pot prohibition would increase safety and “smother the black market,” reducing those jailed for marijuana-related offenses and encouraging small business growth.

Bolander said the measure calls for establishing 10 authorized growing locations. It also gives local communities the power to approve or deny retail locations through subsequent votes.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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As Granville Village Council passed legislation last week decriminalizing possession of small amounts of marijuana, a group urged council members to pass a resolution urging the Ohio General Assembly to legalize medical marijuana statewide.

Council members on Dec. 3 unanimously approved an ordinance change decriminalizing marijuana possession of under 100 grams, making it consistent with state law.

Village Law Director Michael King explained earlier that Granville’s law covering cultivation of marijuana is currently less stringent than it is for possession. Prior to last week’s vote, someone possessing less than 100 grams faced a third-degree misdemeanor criminal charge, while a cultivating charge for less than 100 grams would have been a minor misdemeanor, the equivalent of a traffic citation.

The approved change makes possession of less than 100 grams a minor misdemeanor and more than 100 grams and less than 200 grams a fourth-degree misdemeanor crime, changing it from a third-degree misdemeanor.

King has cautioned that “decriminalization” is not the same as “legalization.”

King acknowledged that Granville resident Dennis Cauchon pointed out this inconsistency as well as another involving marijuana offenses. Earlier this fall, Cauchon informed village officials that the village code still included a clause that appeared to permit use of marijuana for medicinal purposes. Council members later changed the law to match the state’s, which prohibits medical marijuana.

Cauchon and three others were present Dec. 3 to encourage the council to pass a resolution for the General Assembly in support of legalizing medical marijuana. Council members took no action last week on the matter.

“This is the way it’s been done in other states,” Cauchon said, of communities individually endorsing the concept.

“We’ve been a leader on planning and open space,” Cauchon said of Granville. “We’ve been very forward thinking. Just in this little niche it could be beneficial as well.”

King, in answer to a question by Councilwoman Jackie O’Keefe, said the council could legally pass such a resolution.

“It would be something that would have to be taken up statewide,” he said of legalizing medical marijuana.

O’Keefe also asked if marijuana usage causes intoxication, particularly involving drivers.

“The real problem with marijuana and driving is, if you’re an inexperienced driver, and you combine it with alcohol — that’s just plain stupid,” said Robert Ryan, president of the Ohio chapter of National Organization to Reform Marijuana Laws. “Mixing with alcohol is a recipe for disaster.”

Canlis McDerment of Blacklick, president of the central Ohio NORML chapter and a former Fairfield County deputy for 11 years, added, “In my experience in being a deputy sheriff, not one time did I ever pull anyone over who was intoxicated or driving erratically under the influence of marijuana.”

He also encouraged council to pass a resolution of support for medical marijuana. “Sick people need it. This drug is not in any way as harmful as alcohol,” he said.

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Posted: December 18, 2014

Nebraska and Oklahoma have filed a lawsuit against Colorado with the U.S. Supreme Court, saying that its law legalizing marijuana isn’t constitutional.

Nebraska and Oklahoma say Colorado's marijuana law is unconstitutional, in a challenge to the law in the Supreme Court. Earlier this month, visitors from Texas smell marijuana at the Breckenridge Cannabis Club.

Nebraska and Oklahoma say Colorado’s marijuana law is unconstitutional, in a challenge to the law in the Supreme Court. Earlier this month, visitors from Texas smell marijuana at the Breckenridge Cannabis Club. Brennan Linsley

Saying that Colorado’s law legalizing recreational marijuana use is unconstitutional and places a burden on them, Nebraska and Oklahoma have filed a lawsuit against the state with the U.S. Supreme Court.

Marijuana was made legal in Colorado after the state’s voters approved an amendment in 2012. Its first recreational dispensaries opened at the start of this year.

But officials in Nebraska and Oklahoma say Colorado’s pot law has become a destabilizing force in their states, where their legal systems are struggling to enforce the federal ban on marijuana. They believe Colorado isn’t doing enough to keep pot from leaving the state.

From Nebraska, Grant Gerlock of NET News reports:

“The two border states say Colorado’s law legalizing marijuana violates federal law, which still bans the drug. They want the Supreme Court to strike it down.

“Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning says since Colorado legalized pot, police and courts on the border have been strained by an increasing number of marijuana cases.

” ‘While Colorado reaps millions from the production and sale of pot,’ Bruning says. ‘Nebraska taxpayers have to bear the cost. We can’t afford to divert resources to deal with Colorado’s problem.’

“In a statement, Colorado Attorney General John Suthers said he would defend the law. First, the Supreme Court has to decide whether to take up the case.”

In Colorado, Marijuana advocate Mason Tvert tells Colorado Public Radio’s Ben Markus that by filing the lawsuit, Nebraska and Oklahoma “are on the wrong side of history.”

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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